Iewduh or Bara Bazar is probably the oldest and the largest wholesale market in Shillong. Here you can quite literally buy anything, if you look hard enough.

As a local of the hill-city, I have been to Bara Bazar only a few times. And each time I have got lost. Late last year, I lost my way in a different manner. Through the labyrinth-like, dark lanes of the bustling hub, I merrily walked through without leaving a trail. Thrice, I went round in circles in the same area. After a few minutes of resetting my internal navigation system, I finally figured my way out.

That’s the fun in Bara Bazar—it is possible to lose yourself. (And a little frightening too.)

Visiting with this animated market every time is a new experience. I tend to compare it with the wholesale bazars of other cities but this one stands out. Perhaps because it appears to be more organised and the lanes are leaner.

Let me warn you that this is not a tourist haven. The open drains, the aggresive crowds and the low-lit path, do not make for an ideal experience. Go here, if you are adamant to explore, in spite of these factors.

Read: Would You Move To That Place?

Can you trace the crowd back all the way?
Can you trace the crowd all the way?
In the lane selling garments.
The lane selling clothes and bags.
Most shops have tailors who do a quick hem of the newly purchased garments.
Most shops have tailors who do a quick hem of the newly purchased garments.
An entire row of tailors.
An entire row of tailors.
Shopkeeper selling Khasi knives and wooden smoking pipes.
Shopkeeper selling Khasi knives and wooden smoking pipes.
An old-school photo studio.
An old-school photo studio.
Laces and beads.
Laces and beads.
The famous kwai.
The famous kwai of Meghalaya.
Cane things which finds its way to every Shillong household.
Cane things which finds its way to every Shillong household.
The Khasi arrows, intricately held together threads and made of cane and feathers.
The Khasi arrows, intricately held together by threads, and made of cane and feathers.
Entering the books and the stationery market.
Entering the book and stationery market.
Light trying to seep in to the alleys.
Light trying to seep in to the alleys.
A variety of chillies.
A variety of chillies.
Wrapping my dao (or grass cutting spade) safely.
Buying my dao (or grass cutting spade).
Just another shop selling hardware.
Just another shop selling hardware.

Good to know:

-Iewduh is extensive. Plan your travel in advance, especially the entry and exit points.
-Take care of your wallets and bags in this market.
-Wear closed shoes.

Read: The Origins in Shillong

Have you been to any of the bara bazars in India yet?

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Amrita Das

Amrita is a freelance travel writer and professional travel blogger. She has been contributing to some of the top publications in India and internationally. She propagates female solo travel and shares her experiences from off-beat, culture and adventure travel through her writing.

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8 thoughts on “Photo Story: Iewduh, Shillong

  1. Dear Amrita,

    Love this photo story! I also visited Iew Duh earlier this year. I have written on my blog about my visit to Iew Duh, but I was not able to take too many photos to capture the visual experience as well as you have. Since you’ve taken such lovely photos I wanted to share them with my readers, so I’ve have added a link to this post (with due credit, of course!) so people can enjoy the visual experience. I hope that you don’t mind that.

    You can check out what I’ve written here if you are interested: http://chroniclesofafoodintern.blogspot.in/2016/12/iew-duh-shillongs-marvelous-local-market.html

    warmly,
    Shivani :)

    1. Thanks Shivani, both for stopping by and the link back. I hope you will revisit Shillong soon and visually capture it more :)

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